Research Studies

Status: Completed
Study area: Nutrition/Dietary, Healthy Aging, General Wellness
Principal investigator: Howarth NC, Huang TT, Roberts SB, Lin BH, McCrory MA
Project period: 2006

While no one eating occasion contributes more than any other to excess adiposity, eating more often than three times a day may play a role in overweight and obesity in both younger and older persons. A reduced satiety response to dietary fiber in addition to lower energy expenditure may potentially further contribute to weight gain in older persons.

Status: Completed
Study area: CAM Research / Education, Healthy Aging
Principal investigator: Lafferty WE, Downey L, McCarty RL, Standish LJ, Patrick DL
Project period: 2006

Of 27 clinical trials testing massage or mind-body interventions, 26 showed significant improvements in symptoms such as anxiety, emotional distress, comfort, nausea and pain. However, results were often inconsistent across studies and there were variations in methodology, so it was difficult to judge the clinical significance of the results.

Status: Completed
Study area: Nutrition/Dietary, Other
Principal investigator: McCrory MA, Saltzman E, Rolls BJ, Roberts SB
Project period: 2006

The relative effects of energy density and palatability on energy intake, and whether there are familial influences on these effects, are not known.

Status: Completed
Study area: CAM Research / Education
Principal investigator: Standish, Calabrese, Snider, Kail, Mills, Myers, Traub, and Zwic
Project period: 2006
Status: Completed
Study area: General Wellness
Co-investigator(s): Veldhuis JD, Roemmich JN, Richmond EJ, Rogol AD, Lovejoy JC, , Sheffield-Moore M, Mauras N, Bowers CY.
Funded by: Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Medical and Graduate Schools of Medicine, General Clinical Research Center, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. veldhuis.johannes@mayo.edu
Project period: 2005

Body composition exhibits marked variations across the early human lifetime. The precise physiological mechanisms that drive such developmental adaptations are difficult to establish.

Status: Completed
Study area: Immunity, General Wellness
Co-investigator(s): Weber W, Taylor JA, Stoep AV, Weiss NS, Standish LJ, Calabrese C
Funded by: Naturopathic Medicine Department, Bastyr University, Kenmore, WA 98028-4966, USA. wendyw@bastyr.edu
Project period: 2005

Among the 401 children with at least one URI treated with study medication, 69.2% of those receiving placebo developed a second URI versus 55.8% of those who received Echinacea. Use of Echinacea was associated with a 28% decreased risk of subsequent URI (p = 0.01, 95% confidence interval 8%-44% decreased risk).

Status: Completed
Study area: Nutrition/Dietary, General Wellness
Co-investigator(s): Williamson DA, Geiselman PJ, Lovejoy J, Greenway F, Volaufova J, Martin CK, Arnett C, Ortego L
Funded by: Pennington Biomedical Research Center
Project period: 2005

This study tested if: (1) a preload of mycoprotein and tofu consumed before a lunch meal have a greater effect on satiety when compared to achicken preload, (2) the mycoprotein and tofu preloads, compared to chicken, are not associated with compensation or eating more food at asubsequent dinner m

Status: Completed
Study area: Chronic Disease
Co-investigator(s): Aitkens S, Kilmer DD, Wright NC, McCrory MA.
Funded by: Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA
Project period: 2005

People with NMD are at high risk for developing chronic diseases resulting from obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. Intervention studies aimed at reducing their risk for such chronic diseases are warranted.

Status: Completed
Study area: Neurology
Co-investigator(s): Achterberg J, Cooke K, Richards T, Standish LJ, Kozak L, Lake J
Funded by: Earl and Doris Bakken Foundation, North Hawaii Community Hospital, Kamuela, HI 95743, USA. jeannieach@aol.com
Project period: 2005

This study, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology, demonstrated that distant intentionality (DI), defined as sending thoughts at a distance, is correlated with an activation of certain brain functions in the recipients.

Status: Completed
Study area: Nutrition/Dietary, General Wellness
Co-investigator(s): Howarth NC, Huang TT, Roberts SB, McCrory MA
Funded by: University of Hawaii Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, Honolulu, USA
Project period: 2005

 

Pages