Research Studies

Status: Completed
Study area: Nutrition/Dietary, General Wellness
Co-investigator(s): Huang TT, Roberts SB, Howarth NC, McCrory MA
Funded by: School of Nutrition and Exercise Science, Bastyr University, 14500 Juanita Dr. NE, Kenmore, WA 98028, USA
Project period: 2005

We present an updated method for identifying physiologically implausible dietary reports by comparing reported energy intake (rEI) with predicted energy requirements (pER), and we examine the impact of excluding these reports.

Status: Completed
Study area: General Wellness
Co-investigator(s): Lara-Castro C, Hunter GR, Lovejoy JC, Gower BA, Fernández JR
Funded by: Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, USA. larac@uab.edu
Project period: 2005

Genetic variants in the intestinal fatty acid-binding protein-2 (FABP2) gene have been associated with body composition phenotypes.

Status: Completed
Study area: General Wellness
Co-investigator(s): Lara-Castro C, Hunter GR, Lovejoy JC, Gower BA, Fernández JR.
Funded by: Division of Physiology and Metabolism, Department of Nutrition Sciences, University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA. larac@uab.edu
Project period: 2005

To determine the association between the -265 T to C substitution in the apolipoprotein A-II (APOA-II) gene and levels of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in a group of premenopausal African-American and white women, we genotyped 237 women (115 African-American and 122 white) for this polymorphism.

Status: Completed
Study area: Nutrition/Dietary, General Wellness
Co-investigator(s): Lefevre M, Lovejoy JC, Smith SR, Delany JP, Champagne C, Most MM, Denkins Y, de Jonge L, Rood J, Bray GA
Funded by: Pennington Biomedical Research Center, 6400 Perkins Rd, Baton Rouge, LA 70808, USA. lefevrm@pbrc.edu
Project period: 2005

Trans-fatty acids have been implicated as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. In addition, a polymorphism at codon 54 (Ala54Thr) in the fatty acid-binding protein 2 (FABP2) gene has been suggested to modify an interaction between dietary fat and insulin sensitivity.

Status: Completed
Study area: Nutrition/Dietary, General Wellness
Co-investigator(s): Parks EJ, McCrory MA
Project period: 2005
Status: Completed
Study area: Neurology
Co-investigator(s): Richards TL, Kozak L, Johnson LC, Standish LJ.
Funded by: Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.
Project period: 2005

 

Status: Completed
Study area: Nutrition/Dietary, Healthy Aging
Co-investigator(s): Roberts SB, Hajduk CL, Howarth NC, Russell R, McCrory MA
Funded by: The Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Project period: 2005

In contrast to previous suggestions that older persons consume a monotonous diet, this study showed that adults who were 61 years or older consumed a greater total food variety, and a greater variety of micronutrient-dense and energy-weak foods, compared with adults who were 60 years or younger. Although consumption of a low variety of energy-dense foods may contribute to reduced energy intake and body weight at any age, the variety of micronutrient-dense foods consumed needs to increase in old age to prevent micronutrient deficiencies. These findings suggest that all adults need advice on the changing needs for dietary variety with aging to maintain health, and that older persons with low BMI are particularly vulnerable to dietary shortfalls.

Status: Completed
Study area: Nutrition/Dietary, General Wellness
Co-investigator(s): Tulley RT, Vaidyanathan J, Wilson JB, Rood JC, Lovejoy JC,, Most MM, Volaufova J, Peters JC, Bray GA
Funded by: Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70112, USA. rtulley@agcenter.lsu.edu
Project period: 2005

The objective of this study was to determine whether vitamin supplementation during long-term (36 wk) ingestion of olestra supplemented with vitamin E could prevent decreases in vitamin E, vitamin A, and carotenoids.

Status: Completed
Study area: General Wellness
Co-investigator(s): Veldhuis JD, Roemmich JN, Richmond EJ, Rogol AD, Lovejoy JC, , Sheffield-Moore M, Mauras N, Bowers CY.
Funded by: Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Medical and Graduate Schools of Medicine, General Clinical Research Center, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. veldhuis.johannes@mayo.edu
Project period: 2005

Body composition exhibits marked variations across the early human lifetime. The precise physiological mechanisms that drive such developmental adaptations are difficult to establish.

Status: Completed
Study area: Nutrition/Dietary, Chronic Disease
Principal investigator: J Lovejoy
Project period: September 2003 - August 2005

Aims: to transfer internet-based weight loss program on the Healthium platform, conduct focus groups for consumer acceptability and convenience of the interface, and to perform a pilot study in Type 2 Diabetes patients to determine whether the Healthium interface is improving weight loss.

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