Monday, February 3, 2014

Give Your Heart Some Love on Valentine’s Day

Here are some tips to make your special night a healthy night.

Chocolate and strawberries

With Valentine’s Day on the horizon, it's a good time to consider matters of the heart. Along with the love you wish to express, I invited you to think about ways to treat your heart right.

Fortunately, giving your heart some loving care and enjoying an evening with a special someone can go hand-in-hand. Here are some tips to make your special night a healthy night:

  • To start your evening off right, skip the movies this year and do something active. Take a stroll at a park, go bowling or play some mini-golf. By staying active, you help to keep your blood pressure low and burn some extra calories.
  • For your meal, enjoy some amazing seafood. Wild salmon is high in omega-3 essential oils, which are anti-inflammatory and support healthy cholesterol levels.
  • Enjoy a desert full of berries. When you crave sweetness, fruit is a much better choice than ice cream, cake or pie. Berries are rich in proanthocyanidins, nutrients that supports your blood vessels.
  • For the customary gift of chocolate, make sure you give and receive dark chocolate. Dark chocolate is rich in antioxidants and helps protect your heart.

— By Maeghan Culver, ND, naturopathic doctor and resident at Bastyr Center for Natural Health

FALL 2015
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